Daria Morgendorffer helps me parent. Yes, that Daria. 

I’m lying inside a giant box.

No, that’s not some weird metaphor. I am literally lying inside a giant box.

Why? Because when our new fridge arrived the other day, my first thought was, “Charlie’s going to love this box.” And yep, I was right. Now I’m lying inside the giant box as she sleeps sweetly, cuddled into me because, “Mama sleep in box, please,” completely melted my heart. And when your daughter melts your heart. You just can’t say no.

So, as I lie here (at 03:35 am because apparently, my body doesn’t like sleep) I am thinking about the box and why I thought of Charlie when most adults would be excited about the new fridge. (Is it that my brain is now incapable of thinking about anything beyond Charlie? Possible). But then I remembered…Boxing Daria.

For those unfamiliar, Daria was an animated show in the 90s–created by Glenn Eichler and Susie Lewis–and for me, undeniably the best show ever created. Now don’t get confused, animated, yes–but certainly not your typical cutesy, Disney variety (I LOVE those too!). Daria was produced by MTV for a teen audience and it had all your typical teen angsty goodness with a touch of humor. It also spawned my love of satire. In the “Boxing Daria” episode, she finds comfort in a refrigerator box during a difficult time in her early years (thus, me lying in a giant box with my kid). 

While not hugely positive, Daria’s perspectives of the world around her enabled me to explore ideas that challenged social norms and pop culture. I feel like my individualist values are due to her refusal to conform to societal norms. (I’m really putting a lot of stock in a fictional character. Noooot entirely sure what to make of that.)

In my nine years of living in China (It was only supposed to be six months! Yikes!), I’ve witnessed, heard about and experienced for myself cases where people told me what to do and how to do it. I was told how to behave, how I should look, what to eat, what to drink, and what to wear, and what it means to be female and male, and what it means to belong in this society. I’m not saying, this is only in China. I know this happens everywhere. But because of China’s collectivist culture, individualism is not highly valued. There are so many societal pressures and to step away from the norm is just not acceptable here. For some people, at least. But with that, it is also getting a bit better. I still wouldn’t call it progressive, but there are sparks of hope every now and then (Yay, China!)

It’s 06:00 am now and I’m reminiscing about a cartoon (I can almost feel your eye roll…get to the point already). Anyway, so it got me thinking…Daria was socially awkward, completely pessimistic and wasn’t always pleasant to her peers. She was an outlier, yet despite all that, she remained true to herself and it made her resilient. At the end of the day, this is really all I want for Charlie.

I’m excited to watch Daria with Charlie (I mean when she’s 12). It will probably seem so ancient to her by that time, but considering my values are still the same…perhaps, Daria was onto something way back in the 90s.

Case in point, there is so much truth to this response to a question about her goals in life.

(I took this image from Buzzfeed.)

ABC: a playful post about your child’s interests.

“ABC!” My daughter utters this excitedly at least twenty-five times within the first hour of my day. She is 15-months and is thoroughly obsessed with the alphabet. While she’s not yet able to identify the different letters of the alphabet, she’s able to recognise the difference between images, Chinese characters and letters (Humble-brag much?)…So, “ABC” gets thrown at me a lot, because, well—there are a million books in my apartment and almost everything in our daily lives contains words! Okay, okay…I do have a point to make here…

I’m sure you’ve heard that play is essential to children’s development and that you should always try to encourage your child’s interests by creating play experiences that provide opportunities for them to engage in intrinsically motivating activities. What exactly does that mean? Well, look at your child. What are they doing right now? (Sleeping? What are you still doing here?! Go to sleep!) If there is anything at all, whether it’s an image in a book, an object in the room or their own feet that capture their attention for more than a minute it’s interesting to them and chances are there is something there that is intrinsically motivating.

Okay, back to the ABC! (Thanks, Dr. Seuss!) My daughter really loves it and I know, she’s too young to actually learn it and it’s significance in our lives, but like I said, she’s obsessed. So I go with it. I extend her interests, but there is only so many times I can sing ABC before my brain melts. Luckily, there are a million things you can do and no, you don’t need fancy flashcards (they just eat it anyway) or noisy, headache inducing electronic toys. You can create alphabet art out of literally anything you can find lying around in your home—or even on the streets…but remember to sterilize it first! Once, before she was born (…simple times.) I made ‘fairy rice’. Sounds fun, right? It’s actually just raw white rice mixed with vinegar and food colouring. I found them again the other day and grabbed some white glue and a black piece of paper and wrote a ‘C’ with the glue and got her to sprinkle the fairy rice on it, and Voila! Pretty, pretty, Letter C! You know what else is fun? Paper ripping. Do some amazing finger painting and then let that kid just rip it up to their heart’s content—remember to take photos, because it’s really just pure joy—and then make letters out of the small pieces of paper. You can even glue them on letters that I’m sure you had time to carefully draw and cut out. Also, paper ripping is excellent for their fine motor skill acquisition, just sayin’.

Next time you’re locked in pollution prison and you need something to keep the cabin fever at bay, just take a look at your child…what are they telling you, and more important, what can you do to intrinsically motivate them.


This post has also been featured on the Timeout Beijing Family Blog.